written by Eddie Arroyo

There have been many artists who insist on overwhelming a space with their work regardless to whether it conveys the conceptual framework of the exhibit. Not to say this is an easy task as all curators and directors already know to be true. At times, simplicity is a rule of thumb, however, there are moments when the very mission of the work is to tackle the senses in a visual and auditory level. Dorsch has presented two exhibitions and even though these shows are separate they complement each other very well and this has more to do with the deconstructive nature of the work.

Ralph Provisero’s, For Old Times’ Sake harkens back toward nostalgia on many levels both personal and formal. This piece is the third of a series of playground artifacts which include a swing frozen in motion and an abandoned seesaw. The sculpture is literally a fiberglass child’s racecar repurposed kinetically and auditory. It is attached on an industrial coil upon a large steel base. Its motor rotates each time the coil stops; so the car springs is constant and presents the illusion of a race car that wants to take off in motion of but cannot. What needs to be cited as well is that this sculpture is the only piece in Provisero’s exhibition. It occupies a large space where the room has no lighting save but one which is focused on the piece itself.

There is an unsettling tale presented here.

I found myself sympathetic to the car. It’s built for speed and seems to be teased and taunted for being denied its very purpose. The sound of the engine starts the car moves rocking forward then the engine stops and the car rocks back. And this is repeated over and over in a dark room with a spot light to call everyone’s attention to its calamity. I closed my eyes simply to hear the repetitive motion.

The rest of the space follows the exhibitions mission, Let’s Begin with a Line which is a collection of artist which presents their interpretation of the linear. Over all, it is playful in nature as it moves from medium to medium. From Brookhart Jonquil florescent sculpture, “Concentric Pentagons” which are created by three fluorescent tubes and mirrored acrylic which question the form of space and perspective to Lee Ranaldo, “Black Noise” which are scratchy vinyl records etchings which seemed to have lost their initial purpose to convey its current one.

The “Space Drawing” of Ryan Roa was engaging as it extrudes itself from the wall. Seems to be more of a mathematical explosion moving from the floor to the wall to the ceiling or where ever visual beginning and ending one chooses. Jenny Brillart installation steeped in location and form which has always been the essence of her work – materials lend themselves to explore these ideas further. Jiae Hwang installation seems to question the formality of the line itself and its role in an aesthetic function with “The background and the Frame” as the lines move across the walls dancing from one end to another.

Overall, the exhibition is a wonderful exercise of deconstruction to make room for a fresh structure.

Jenny Brillhart
Peter Demos
Katie Hinton
Jiae Hwang
Brookhart Jonquil
Zerek Kempf
JT Kirkland
Jeroen Nelemans
Martin Pelenur
Lee Ranaldo
Ryan Roa
Jennifer Lauren Smith
Robert Thiele

and a poem by Matt Gajewski.

www.dorschgallery.com

Ralph Provisero | Spring Rider
Third work in Playground Remnants series
fiberglass shell, go-cart parts, motor, automobile spring, metal table
2012
52 inches x 10 feet

Brookhart Jonquil | Concentric Pentagons
mirrored acrylic, fluorescent lights, paint
2012
dimensions variable

Ryan Roa | Space Drawing #20
bungee cables, steel hooks
2011
5 x 10 feet

Jiae Hwang | The background and the frame
wood, paint, vinyl
2012
dimensions variable

Robert Thiele

Lee Ranaldo | Black Noise | working states 1-3
Drypoint on vinyl records on Arches Velin Rives Blanc
2012
39.5 x 35.5 cm
final edition size: 8 + 2 ap

Jenny Brillhart | The Vagabond
oil on panel and drywall
12.5 x 92 inches
2012
There are three configurations of this installation

Jenny Brillhart | The Vagabond
oil on panel and drywall
12.5 x 92 inches
2012
There are three configurations of this installation

JT Kirkland | Subspace_37_38_39_40_48
acrylic, polyacrylic, walnut on plywood
2011
7.75 x 7.75 x 0.75 inches